Galerie Tschudi

Artists
Artists
Julian Charrière

Iroojrilik, 2016

Video, 24 min, Sound Edward Davenport

Julian Charrière

Julian Charrière / Julius von Bismark

Objects In Mirror Might Be Closer Than They Appear V, 2016

Archival pigment print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag
82 x 62 cm (framed)

Julian Charrière

Julian Charrière / Julius von Bismark

Objects In Mirror Might Be Closer Than They Appear II, 2016

Archival pigment print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag
82 x 62 cm (framed)

Julian Charrière

Julian Charrière / Julius von Bismark

Objects In Mirror Might Be Closer Than They Appear VII, 2016

Archival pigment print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag
82 x 62 cm (framed)

Julian Charrière

Future Fossil Spaces, 2015

three hexagonal towers, salt stone and plaster
310 x 60 x 60 cm
223 x 60 x 60 cm
170 x 60 x 60 cm

Julian Charrière

Future Fossil Spaces, 2017

Installation view: La Biennale di Venezia, Arsenale, 57th International Art Exhibition
VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, Germany

Julian Charrière

Savannah Shed, 2016

Concrete, detector shield, scintillation pectometer, crocodile, tape, 96 x 102 x 251 cm

Julian Charrière

Pacific Fiction – Study for Monument, 2016

coconut Sarcophagi, 128 cm high in steel frame of 227 x 203 cm, overall size: 330 x 440 cm

Julian Charrière

Lost at Sea – Pikini-Fragment, 2016

High pollished stainless steel, coral sand, mutated bikinian coconut, glass, 175 x 32 x 32 cm

Julian Charrière

Eninman IV – Terminal Beach

Archival pigment print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag, mounted on aluminium Dibond, red Palmira veneered frame, Mirogard anti-reflective glass, 122.8 x 152.8 cm (framed)

Julian Charrière

Oamen IV – Terminal Beach, 2016

Archival pigment print on Hahnemühle Photo Rag, mounted on aluminium Dibond, red Palmira veneered frame, Mirogard anti-reflective glass, 122.8 x 152.8 cm (framed)

Julian Charrière

A Sky Taste of Rock
57.034634, -111.705807, 2016

Bitume photography on high polished stainless steel frame, Dyptich, each frame 81.5 x 101.5 cm

Julian Charrière

Tropisme, 2015

frozen plant, refrigerated showcase, 208 x 66 x 66 cm

Julian Charrière

Somewhere, 2014

video, color sound, 16 min 24 (Sound: Edward Davenport)

Julian Charrière

Exhibition View
«Metamorphism, 2016»

Artificial lava stone and molten computer waste (main boards, CPUs, RAMs, hard drives, cables)

Julian Charrière

Somehow they never stop doing what they always did, 2013

Concrete, plaster, nutrients, double glazed glass, vitrine, metal, Dimensions variable

Julian Charrière

Somehow they never stop doing what they always did, 2013

Concrete, plaster, nutrients, double glazed glass, vitrine, metal, Dimensions variable

Julian Charrière

The Blue Fossil Entropic Stories, 2013

Fine Art Print, dimensions variable “The Blue Fossil Entropic Stories” is the photographic trace of an expedition the artist undertook in 2013, travelling to Iceland to climb an iceberg in the Arctic Ocean and melt the frozen water beneath his feet with a gas torch during 8 hours. Like an absurd, quixotic hero, Julian Charrière confronts the elements in a seemingly hopeless battle – human time against geological time. And yet, a battle of which global warming is only the starting point. What remains of this perilous endeavour are three photographs of arresting beauty, a kind of contemporary version of Caspar David Friedrich's Wanderer Overlooking the Sea of Fog (1817–18), and a questioning of our relation to nature as inherited from the Romantics via ecological thought.

Julian Charrière

Some Pigeons Are More Equal Than Others, 2012

Print on Hahnemühle Museum Etching Paper, 38 x 27 cm
In collaboration with Julius von Bismarck “Some Pigeons Are More Equal Than Others” is a collaboration with Julius Von Bismarck and has been performed and exhibited in Copenhagen, Venice, and Berlin. It engages the city as a robust spatial ecology of things, perceptions, movements and constant surprise. It includes a pigeon trapping apparatus designed by the artists. This apparatus is installed in public space to catch and airbrush pigeons as they move through the city. The pigeons are painted, dressed with vibrant, nontoxic dyes, rendered and released back into the urban environments we all share and constitute by this sharing. While the paint is harmless to the health of the pigeons, it destabilizes the safety of our perceptions concerning the roles, art, institutions, and urban species—including humans, when species meet in public space, the space of their rights and of our everyday lives. Painted pigeons meet each different city on its own material terms—as a horizon of different species and perceptions which co-constitute each other, and renegotiate those terms.

Julian Charrière

Polygon XXX, 2014

black and white double exposure medium format flm on baryta paper, steel frame, 120 x 140 cm, Edition of 3 (+1AP)